EMT Transition Course Online

Additional Training

Course Overview

History

Course Outline

NREMT Transition Policy

EMT-B to Emergency Medical Technician

Additional Content That May Be Included

YOUR Steps to Transition (EMT-Basic to EMT)

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This course has been approved for 24 hours of instructor based continuing education by California C.E. Provider #56-0013 and/or 24 hours of distance education credit through the NREMT.

Additional Training

Prerequisites and Co-Requisites

While NREMT has established the need for EMT Transition training, they have allowed each state to set its own standards for what is required for EMT Transition Training and which courses are accepted. This includes training required as a prerequisite or co-requisite.

 

California

In California, ICS-100, ICS-700 and Hazmat First Responder Awareness (FRA) training is required to receive EMT Transition certification. As part of this training course, students are required to submit proof of certification for having taken these classes before an EMT Transition certificate is issued. These courses can be purchased with the EMT Transition as packages deals. See the Options Tab or more detail.

 

Other States

Please check with your local State EMS Agency to see what prerequisites or co-requisites are required in your state.

 

 

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Course Overview

Course and Book With Expedited Shipping: $295

Course and Book With Standard Shipping: $275

Course With No Book* (for those who already have it): $225

 

*Although not required, the textbook is strongly recommended in order to pass the course.

 

Package Deals

In California, ICS-100, ICS-700 and Hazmat First Responder Awareness (FRA) training is required to receive EMT Transition certification. These courses can be purchased with the EMT Transition as packages deals.

 

 

About the Online EMT Transition Course

Our EMT Transition Online course is designed for EMT-Basics who look to become eligible for National EMS Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (NREMT). Under the new EMS Education Standards, if you are an EMT-Basic who has an expiration date of March 31, 2011 or March 31, 2012, then you have two registration cycles (4 years) to complete a state approved Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) to Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) transition course in order to be eligible for National EMS Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (NREMT).

 

To transition to the EMT level, the NREMT-Basic is not required to complete a National EMS Certification Examination.

 

You have the option to purchase a textbook with this training. Although not required, the textbook is strongly recommended in order to pass the course.

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History

Excerpts from the Fall 2011 NREMT Newsletter

During the next four years everyone in EMS will be going through a \93transition\94 from levels of certification designated in the 1990\92s to new titles with new interventions and responsibilities. These changes have been planned since 2000 and are being accomplished in conjunction with the EMS Education Agenda for the Future:  A Systems Approach. Hundreds of national EMS leaders participated in discussions with states and stakeholders to help everyone arrive at this decision over the past 11 years.

 

First, a little history regarding the EMS title of Emergency Medical Technician-Basic and the new Emergency Medical Technician. In 1969, via a Federal contract, Dunlap and Associates produced the first Emergency Medical Technician Ambulance course. Many aspiring providers took this course and became EMT-As. When the NREMT started a certification at that level in 1971, in order for a provider to obtain certification, he or she had to have six months of experience working in the pre-hospital setting in order to be a NREMT-A. Later, some EMT-As began to work in health care settings and soon an NREMT-Non- Ambulance was designated. In 1989, the NREMT Board of Directors desired to reduce the confusion between EMT-Ambulance and Non-Ambulance and designated the title EMT-Basic, following the title used by some states. In 1994 the Department of Transportation (DOT), released a national standard curriculum titled, Emergency Medical Technician-Basic. Between 2004 and 2006, the National Association of State EMS Officials, in conjunction with other national stakeholder groups, developed and released the National EMS Scope of Practice Model, one of the components of the EMS Education Agenda for the Future. Part of those discussions concluded with changing the name of Emergency Medical Technician-Basic to Emergency Medical Technician and expanded their knowledge and patient care abilities. Added to the National EMS scope of practice model and education standards was a change from assessment-based patient care towards diagnostic-based patient care, more extensive knowledge to assess and understand patient conditions and use of pulse oximeters for assessment purposes. Although many providers believe \93skills\94 determine the value of a provider, the focus of these changes were to increase the \93knowledge\94 of future EMS providers when compared to those educated under the 1994 National Standard Curriculum. These changes in responsibilities and knowledge nationally require each state to review their scopes of practice and assure providers meet, at least, the minimum national standards. The National Registry, in concert with the EMS Education Agenda for the Future, is likewise making this \93transition.\94 However, each of the 50 states in the U.S. may adopt a variety of policies and educational interpretations regarding what you will need to do to complete the \93transition\94. Because of the state variations, the NREMT has implemented a standardized reporting process. You will need to follow this to maintain your National EMS Certification and become an Emergency Medical Technician (NREMT). Please note, the education you must complete: the course length, format and locations are under the direction of your state EMS office. If you telephone the NREMT with questions on where to attend these courses, or on what you are to do to obtain the education, the NREMT will be referring you to your respective state EMS office.

 

The NREMT is requiring the education as part of our continued certification process, but we do not provide education. Providing EMS education is a state or local EMS system responsibility. We will recognize your state approved education and we are requesting that your education course completion certificate indicates you have completed a \93transition/refresher\94 course.

 

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Course Outline

About This Course

This course consists of 55 sections broken down into 6 modules. At the end of each module you will complete an Objectives Learned assignment.

 

Course Exams

This course has one comprehensive final exam based upon the material covered in the course's 6 modules. The final exam consists of 100 questions randomly selected from a large pool of questions. A score of 80% or better is required to pass the final exam. If a student does not pass the final exam the first time, they may retake the exam as many times as necessary in order to pass.

 

Course Sections

This course consists of 55 sections broken down into 6 modules. Students are required to take each section in sequential order as listed below.

 

Module 1
01 - Workforce Safety and Wellness
02 - Therapeutic Communication
03 - Legal Issues in EMSs
04 - Anatomy and Physiology: Cellular Metabolism
05 - Ambient Air, Airway, and Mechanics of Ventilation
06 - Regulation of Ventilation, Ventilation/Perfusion Ratio, & Transport of Gases
07 - Blood, Cardiac Function, and the Vascular System
08 - Life Span Development
09 - Public Health and EMS
10 - EMS Pharmacology
MODULE 1 ASSIGNMENT - OBJECTIVES LEARNED
Module 2
11 - Medical Terminology
12 - Issues in Airway Management, Oxygenation, and Ventilation
13 - Critical Thinking
14 - Assessment of the Trauma Patient
15 - Assessment of the Medical Patient
MODULE 2 ASSIGNMENT - OBJECTIVES LEARNED
Module 3
16 - Neurology: Altered Mental Status
17 - Neurology: Stroke
18 - Neurology: Seizures
19 - Abdominal Emergencies and Gastrointestinal Bleeding
20 - Immunology: Anaphylactic and Anaphylactoid Reactions
21 - Endocrine Emergencies: Diabetes Mellitus and Hypoglycemia k
22 - Endocrine Emergencies: Hyperglycemic Disorders
23 - Psychiatric Disorders
24 - Cardiovascular Emergencies: Chest Pain and Acute Coronary Syndrome
25 - Cardiovascular Emergencies: Congestive Heart Failure
26 - Cardiovascular Emergencies: Hypertensive and Vascular Emergencies
MODULE 3 ASSIGNMENT - OBJECTIVES LEARNED
Module 4
27 - Toxicology: Street Drugs
28 - Respiratory Emergencies: Airway Resistance Disorders
29 - Respiratory Emergencies: Lung and Gas Exchange Disorders
30 - Respiratory Emergencies: Infectious Disorders
31 - Hematology: Blood Disorders Disorders
32 - Renal Disorders
33 - Gynecologic Emergencies
34 - Emergencies Involving the Eyes, Ears, Nose, and Throat
35 - Issues in Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation
36 - Shock
MODULE 4 ASSIGNMENT - OBJECTIVES LEARNED
Module 5
37 - Bleeding and Bleeding Control
38 - Chest Trauma
39 - Abdominal Trauma
40 - Soft Tissue Injuries: Crush Injury and Compartment Syndrome
41 - Orthopedic Trauma
42 - Head and Traumatic Brain Injury
43 - Complete and Incomplete Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries
MODULE 5 ASSIGNMENT - OBJECTIVES LEARNED
Module 6
44 - Trauma in Special Populations: Pediatrics
45 - Trauma in Special Populations: Geriatric
46 - Trauma in Special Populations: Pregnancy
47 - Diving Emergencies: Decompression Sickness and Arterial Embolism
48 - Lightning Strike injuries
49 - Obstetrics (Antepartum Complications)
50 - Neonatology
51 - Pediatrics
52 - Geriatrics
53 - Special Challenges
54 - Safely Operating an Ambulance
55 - Multiple-Casualty Incidents and Incident Management
MODULE 6 ASSIGNMENT - OBJECTIVES LEARNED

 

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NREMT Transition Policy

Adopted June 8, 2011, the NREMT Board of Directors is committed to implementation of the EMS Education Agenda for the Future:  A Systems Approach. Included within this agenda is the National EMS Scope of Practice Model. Therefore, in order for NREMTs to maintain National EMS Certification, as outlined in the EMS Education Agenda for the Future, all NREMTs must meet the minimum requirements of knowledge and skills outlined in the National EMS Scope of Practice Model.

 

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EMT-B to Emergency Medical Technician

 

All NREMT-Basics who have expiration dates of March 31, 2011 or March 31, 2012 have two registration cycles (four years) to complete a state approved Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) to Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) transition course in order to be eligible for National EMS Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (NREMT).

 

To transition to the EMT level, the NREMT-Basic is not required to complete a National EMS Certification Examination.

 

NREMT-Basics who submit an acceptable recertification application, but do not include successful completion of a state-approved transition course from EMT Basic to EMT, will be issued National EMS Certification as an Emergency Medical Responder (NREMR) upon reaching their expiration date of March 31, 2015 or 2016.

 

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Additional Content That May Be Included

  • Pulse oximetry
  • ATV
  • Humidified oxygen
  • Partial rebreather mask, simple face mask, Venturi mask, tracheostomy mask
  • Mechanical CPR device
  • Hemorrhage control (direct/tourniquet)
  • Oral aspirin
  • Assisting patients w/self medication
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    IMPORTANT TO NOTE! You may already be performing some of these interventions under the authority of your State EMS office rules and regulations or by your local treatment protocols.

     

    YOUR Steps to Transition (EMT-Basic to EMT)

    1. Complete the transition course during one of your next two recertification cycles
    2. Obtain a completion certificate for the course
    3. Provide the certificate along with your other recertification materials to the NREMT by your recertification deadline (March 31)

     

    Failure to provide the required documentation within two recertification cycles will result in your being issued National EMS Certification as an Emergency Medical Responder (NREMR) upon reaching their expiration date of March 31, 2015 or 2016.

     

    EMT-Basic, Intermediate/85 and Paramedic to EMT, AEMT and Paramedic

     

    Current Certification Expires   Complete Transition By:
    March 31, 2011  March 31, 2015
    March 31, 2012   March 31, 2016

     

    Certificates must have this information on them:

     

  • NREMT-Basic's name
  • transition course completion date
  • the following statement: "[your name] has completed a state approved EMT-Basic to Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) transition course."
  • name of the sponsoring agency
  • signature of the individual responsible for the training
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